Posts filed under ‘Counter Terrorism’

FRIDAY FOTO (September 5, 2014)

Dawn’s Early Lights

U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Vernon Young Jr.

U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Vernon Young Jr.

U.S. Air Force Capt. Erica Stooksbury adjusts the cockpit lighting controls as the sun rises following a humanitarian airdrop mission over Amirli, Iraq, Aug. 31, 2014. Two C-17s dropped 79 container delivery system bundles of fresh drinking water totaling 7,513 gallons. In addition, two U.S. C-130s aircraft dropped 30 bundles totaling 3,032 gallons of fresh drinking water and 7,056 meals ready to eat

Stooksbury is a C-17 Globemaster III pilot assigned to the assigned to the 816th Expeditionary Airlift Squadron.   

September 5, 2014 at 1:34 am Leave a comment

AROUND AFRICA Update 2: Al Shabaab Blitz; Ebola Crisis, Niger Drone Base, Rwanda Verdict, Bastille Day

Somalia Islamists Attacked.

Updates with al Shabaab leader’s death confirmed.

Islamist militants in Mogadishu, Somalia.(Photo copyright, Kate Holt, IRIN)

Islamist militants in Mogadishu, Somalia.(Photo copyright, Kate Holt, IRIN)

The U.S. military today (Friday, September 5) that the leader of the African Islamist extremist group, al Shabaab, was killed in the drone missile attack in Somalia earlier this week.

Witnesses said drones fired at least four missiles Monday (September 1) in the Lower Shabelle region of Somalia, destroying two al Shabaab vehicles, according to the Voice of America website. On Tuesday (September 2), the Defense Department disclosed that the head of al Shabaab was the target of the attack.

 “We have confirmed that Ahmed Godane, the co-founder of al-Shabaab, has been killed,” Pentagon spokesman Rear Admiral John Kirby announced today in a press statement that did not detail how Godane’s identity and death was cestablished. “Removing Godane from the battlefield is a major symbolic and operational loss to al-Shabaab. The United States works in coordination with its friends, allies and partners to counter the regional and global threats posed by violent extremist organizations,” the published statement continued.

Previously, Kirby said U.S. special operations forces using manned and unmanned aircraft destroyed an encampment and a vehicle using several Hellfire missiles and laser-guided munitions,” according to a transcript of Tuesday’s Pentagon press briefing.

It was the most aggressive U.S. military operation in nearly a year, coming as the President Barack Obama’s administration grapples with security crises in Iraq, Syria and Ukraine, the Washington Post noted. Al Shabaab, which means “the youth,” in Arabic, is a jihadist movement affiliated with al Qaeda that started in Somalia “a chronically unstable country on the Horn of Africa,” and has grown into a regional terrorist group that has carried out attacks in Uganda and Kenya — including last year’s Nairobi shopping mall attack that left scores of dead and injured. Al Shabaab has also cooperated with another al Qaeda branch in Yemen, the Post added.

Al Jazeera reported that the jihadist group confirmed it had come under attack but would not Godane’s situation. The attack comes just a few days after African Union troops and Somali government forces launched a major offensive aimed at seizing key ports from al Shabaab and cutting off key sources of revenue, said Al Jazeera. The Associated Press reported that the air strikes killed six militants but it was not known at the time if Godane was among the dead.

*** *** ***

Widening Ebola Threat

Health workers treating Ebola patients in Africa. (World Health Organization photo by Christine Banluta)

Health workers treating Ebola patients in Africa. (World Health Organization photo by Christine Banluta)

The head of an international medical aid, group, Medecins sans Frontieres (MSF, Doctors without Borders), says the world is losing the battle to contain the deadly Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa.

Military teams should be sent to the region immediately if there is to be any hope of controlling the epidemic, MSF’s international president Dr. Joanne Liu told the United Nations Tuesday (September 2), painting a stark picture of health workers dying, patients left without care and infectious bodies lying in the streets, The Guardian website reports.

Although alarm bells have been ringing for six months, the response had been too little, too late and no amount of vaccinations and new drugs would be able to prevent the escalating disaster, Liu told U.N. officials, adding: “Six months into the worst Ebola epidemic in history, the world is losing the battle to contain it.”

Ebola has spread to a fifth West African nation. Senegal’s health minister, Awa Marie Coll Seck has confirmed that country’s first Ebola case. On Friday (August 29), she said a young man from Guinea with the deadly disease had crossed into Senegal, where he was promptly put in isolation, according to Al Jazeera. Other countries reporting Ebola cases include: Sierra Leone, Liberia and Nigeria.

The current outbreak, which first appeared in Guinea, has killed more the 1,900 people across the region since March, according to the World Health Organization, the BBC reported. At least 3,000 people have been infected with the virus and the World Health Organization has warned the outbreak could grow and infect more than 20,000 people.

Meanwhile, fear and ignorance is blamed for the violent — and unhelpful reaction is some places in the region. In Liberia, one of the three hardest-hit nations, there have been clashes between soldiers and residents of quarantined slum area in the capital, Monrovia. In Nigeria, residents in some areas are protesting against the idea of building isolation units in their neighborhoods. The Voice of America reported  Friday (August 29) that people have taken to the streets in the northern city of Kaduna, protesting plans to convert sections of a local clinic into an Ebola treatment center. In many parts of Nigeria residents say they fear Ebola more than Boko Haram, the militant Islamist group that has killed thousands of people.

*** *** ***

2nd Niger Drone Base UPDATE

Map of Niger (CIA World Factbook)

Map of Niger
(CIA World Factbook)

After months of negotiations, the government of Niger in West Africa has authorized the U.S. military to fly unarmed drones from the mud-walled desert city of Agadez, according to Nigerien and U.S. officials, the Washington Post reports.

The previously undisclosed decision gives the Pentagon another surveillance hub — its second in Niger and third in the region — to track Islamist fighters who have destabilized parts of North and West Africa. It also advances a little-publicized U.S. strategy to tackle counterterrorism threats alongside France, the former colonial power in that part of the continent, the military newspaper said.

The United States started drone surveillance flights out of Niamey, Niger’s capital, in early 2013 to support French forces fighting Islamist militants in northern Mali. Washington always intended to move the operation further north and now the details have been worked out to relocate the flights to a base in Agadez, about 500 miles (800 kilometers) from Niamey, said a U.S. defense official speaking on condition of anonymity, Defense News reported.

The U.S. Air Force also flies unmanned aircraft out of Chad to help locate hundreds of school girls kidnapped by the radical Islamist group, Boko Haram, in Nigeria.

*** *** ***

Rwanda Verdict

A South African court has found four of six suspects charged with trying to assassinate a former Rwandan Army general guilty of attempted murder. Two other men accused in the 2010 attack on Faustin Nyamwasa in Johannesburg, South Africa that left him wounded.

Nyamwasa fled Rwanda in 2010 after a dispute President Paul Kagame, al Jazeera reported. According to the an Al Jazeera reporter, Nyamwasa does not blame the four who were convicted, saying they were “used” by the Rwandan government. According to Al Jazeera’s Tania Page, the trial judge was convinced the murder attempt was politically motivated by people in Rwanda. Kagame denies involvement in the attack.

Police broke up another murder plot against the general in 2011 and early this year armed men attacked his Johannesburg house in a separate incident.

*** *** ***

Africa at Bastille Day UPDATE

African troops march in Bastille Day parade in Paris July 14. (Photo: SCH Sébastien Lelièvre/SIRPA Terre)

African troops march in Bastille Day parade in Paris July 14.
(Photo: SCH Sébastien Lelièvre/SIRPA Terre)

Troops from several African nations that served as peacekeepers during the French intervention in Mali were among the contingents July 14 during the annual Bastille Day parade in Paris. Among the troops in this photo, all wearing the blue United Nations beret are soldiers from Chad, Niger, Senegal and Nigeria.

(Click on the photo to enlarge. To see more photos of the 2014 Bastille Day military parade in Paris, click here.

September 3, 2014 at 11:51 pm 1 comment

ADVISORY

On Vacation

Boulder, Colorado at  sunset (4GWAR Photo by John M. Doyle)

Boulder, Colorado at sunset
(4GWAR Photo by John M. Doyle)

Your 4GWAR editor is away in Colorado on vacation.

The 4GWAR blog will resume Saturday, August 23 with the FRIDAY FOTO (a little bit later than usual).

 

August 20, 2014 at 10:55 pm Leave a comment

AFRICA: Mali President on Northern Region’s Woes

Completely Lawless.

Mali's President Keita at an African-European summit in Dakar in April (Republic of Mali website)

Mali’s President Keita at an African-European summit in Dakar in April
(Republic of Mali website)

Before heading home from the U.S.-Africa Business Forum that ended Wednesday (August 6), President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita of Mali spoke at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, a Washington think tank.

Keita told an overflow crowd at CSIS Thursday (August 7)  that international intervention – especially military logistics — had helped bring his country back from the brink following a 2012 military coup and rebellion in Mali’s northern deserts by nomadic Tuaregs and radical Islamist militants. But the threat to Mali, the region and the world isn’t over, Keita warned. “We’re at a strategic nexus. This is a completely lawless region,” Keita said, according to simultaneous translation of his remarks given in French.

Compounding the problem in the north — an area bigger than Texas — a flow of heavy weapons out of neighboring Libya, and Tuareg mercenaries who know how to use them, after the fall of Libyan strongman Muammar Qaddafi in 2011.

Mali and its neighbors (CIA World Factbook)

Mali and its neighbors
(CIA World Factbook)

For more on Keita’s talk at CSIS, see an UPDATE to yesterday’s AROUND AFRICA blog posting.

 

 

 

August 7, 2014 at 12:50 pm Leave a comment

AROUND AFRICA: Washington Summit, Mali President, Ebola Update, Boko Haram Attack UPDATE

UPDATES with Mali president’s discussion of security issues in the Sahel at Washington think tank appearance.

Africa on the Potomac.

President Barack Obama poses for a group photo with African leaders at a three-day business forum in Washington. (White House photo)

President Barack Obama poses for a group photo with African leaders at a three-day business forum in Washington.
(White House photo)

Leaders from nearly 50 African nations are heading home after a three-day business forum with U.S. corporate executives in Washington organized by President Barack Obama.

Obama did not meet privately with any of the African leaders but  addressed the U.S.-Africa Business Forum and hosted a dinner for the African dignitaries on the South Lawn of the White House, the New York Times reported.

Obama also announced $12 billion in new funding for his administration’s Power Africa initiative, which aims to provide electricity to households across sub Saharan Africa. He also promoted $14 billion in new investments by American companies in Africa, including $5 billion from Coca-Cola, according to the Times.

The White House said those and other new commitments “amount to more than $33 billion, supporting economic growth across Africa and tens of thousands of U.S. jobs.”

The gathering was overshadowed in part by the deadly Ebola outbreak in West Africa and ongoing violence in a number of countries like Nigeria, Sudan, Somalia and the Central African Republic. Some African leaders bristled at press questions about the Ebola epidemic, which has claimed 900 lives in the West African nations of Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. The presidents of Liberia and Sierra Leone skipped the business summit to deal with the health crisis in their countries.

One of the delegates to the business forum,  President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita of Mali will be speaking Thursday (August 7) at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. The topic is Security in the Sahel, where military coups, revolts, kidnappings of foreigners and terror attacks by Islamist militants have rocked the arid North Africa region south of the Sahara. Your 4GWAR Editor monitored his talk and the ensuing question and answer session. See next item.

*** *** ***

Mali President

A French AMX-10RCR armored reconnaissance vehicle in convoy near Gao in the drive against Islamist fighters in Mali. (Copyright Frenh Ministry of Defense)

A French AMX-10RCR armored reconnaissance vehicle in convoy near Gao in the drive against Islamist fighters in Mali.
(Copyright Frenh Ministry of Defense)

Before heading home from the U.S.-Africa Business Forum, President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita of Mali spoke at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, a Washington think tank.

Keita told an overflow crowd a CSIS that international assistance – especially military logistics — had helped bring his country back from the brink following a 2012 military coup and rebellion in Mali’s northern deserts by nomadic Tuaregs and radical Islamist militants. But the threat to Mali, the region and the world isn’t over, Keita warned. “We’re at a strategic nexus. This is a completely lawless region,” Keita, who spoke in French and sometimes English, said through an interpreter.

For decades, the Tuaregs have rebelled against the government in Bamako, claiming their health, education and economic needs were being ignored in the southern capital. Because of the harsh physical and economic landscape of the north. “rebels are in a situation of despair” and that makes them receptive to the message of outsiders  armed with cash as well as guns and preaching jihad against westerners and Bamako, he said. “New jihadists may be trained in that region” and that poses a danger for world peace, said Keita, who was elected president in July 2013. Compounding the problem, a flow of heavy weapons out of neighboring Libya and Tuareg mercenaries who know how to use them after the fall of Libyan strongman Muammar Qaddafi in 2011

He said Bamako wants to assist the north and has pooled “millions of dollars” for that purpose, but asked how could the government develop the region or build a school amid constant fighting. “We have no other choice but to move toward peace. We need peace to rebuild Mali,” Keita said.

Mali's President Keita at an African-European summit in Dakar in April (Republic of Mali website)

Mali’s President Keita at an African-European summit in Dakar in April
(Republic of Mali website)

*** *** ***

Ebola Toll Rises

Electron micrograph of an Ebola virus virion. (Centers for Disease Control)

Electron micrograph of an Ebola virus virion.
(Centers for Disease Control)

In Liberia, President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf has declared a state of emergency as the country grapples with the deadly Ebola virus.

Speaking on national television she said some civil liberties might have to be suspended, the BBC reported. The Ebola outbreak has killed more than 930 people in Liberia, Guinea, Sierra Leone and Nigeria — where a second death has been reported, according to the Voice of America.

World Health Organization (WHO) experts are meeting in Geneva, Switzerland, to discuss a response to the outbreak. The two-day meeting will decide whether to declare a global health emergency, according to the BBC.

Meanwhile, President Obama said it is “premature” to send an experimental medicine for the treatment of Ebola. Obama said Wednesday (August 6) that he lacked enough information to green-light a promising medicine called ZMapp that was already used on two American aid workers who saw their conditions improve by varying degrees, Al Jazeera America reported. There is no known cure for the virus which has a fatality ate between 60 and 90 percent.

*** *** ***

Attack in Cameroon

Cameroon (CIA World Factbook)

Cameroon
(CIA World Factbook)

Ten people were killed and a child was kidnapped in an attack by suspected Boko Haram militants on a remote part of northern Cameroon.

Police said the militants gunned down nine civilians and a soldier in the town of Zigague. State-run radio reported the kidnapped child is he daughter of a local chief, the Voice of America website reported.

Boko Haram extremists have killed thousands of people in its five-year campaign to turn northern Nigeria into a strict Islamic state. Their violence often spills over into neighboring countries like Cameroon. The latest attack follows the deployment of more than 1,000 soldiers along Cameroon’s long and porous border with Nigeria last month.

Cameroon’s President, Paul Biya last week dismissed two senior army officers leading the battle against Islamist militants just two days after militants abducted the deputy prime minister’s wife and  her maid from the northern town of Kologata, according to the BBC. The raiders also kidnapped a local religious leader who is also the town’s mayor

 

August 6, 2014 at 11:59 pm Leave a comment

AFGHANISTAN: U.S. Army General Killed 14 Wounded in Insider Attack UPDATE

Kabul Carnage.

UPDATES with additional Kirby comment about shooter from press conference transcript and background on Greene from Reuters report

Pentagon Press Secretary Rear Adm. John Kirby reports on Kabul shootings at briefing in Washington.  (Defense Dept. photo  by Casper Manlangit)

Pentagon Press Secretary Rear Adm. John Kirby reports on Kabul shootings at briefing in Washington.
(Defense Dept. photo by Casper Manlangit)

A man wearing an Afghan Army uniform opened up with a machine gun during a visit by coalition military brass Tuesday (August 5) in Kabul, killing a U.S. Army major general and wounding at least 14 others in the room including a German brigadier general and three Afghan officers.

The slain two-star general, the highest ranking Western military officer killed in Afghanistan, was identified as Major General Harold Greene, the coalition mission’s deputy commander for training Afghan troops. As with many of these so called green-on-blue attacks it is not immediately clear whether the attacker was an actual member of the Afghan National Army or an infiltrator from the Taliban or al Qaeda who acquired an Afghan uniform.

It was the 55-year-old Greene’s first combat deployment to Afghanistan after a lengthy Army career as an engineer and logistics expert, according to the Los Angeles Times, Greene, assigned to the International Security Assistance Force (ISAF), the coalition military command in Afghanistan, is believed to be the highest-ranking U.S. military officer killed overseas since the Vietnam War, according to Reuters.

At a news briefing, Navy Rear Admiral John Kirby, the Pentagon press secretary, said the coalition troops were on a routine site visit to the Marshal Fahim National Defense University, the academy for Afghan commissioned and non-commissioned officers. Kirby said there were a number of casualties “perhaps up to 15″ including some Americans. Many were seriously wounded. “The assailant was killed,” he said.

Kirby stressed that an investigation was just getting underway and not all the facts are in yet. “We believe this individual was a member of the Afghan national security forces,” the admiral said, adding: “We need to let the investigation proceed to figure out exactly who this was before we can leap to any conclusions about the vetting process.”

According to  The Long War Journal, Tuesday’s attack is the third reported green-on-blue attack in Afghanistan this year — and the sixth to have taken place in the Afghan capital since January 2007. The website has kept extensive and updated statistics and analysis of insider attacks since a 2012 Special Report.

August 5, 2014 at 11:56 pm Leave a comment

FRIDAY FOTO (August 1, 2014)

Knotty Problem

 U.S. Army photo by Master Sgt. Alex Licea

U.S. Army photo by Master Sgt. Alex Licea

A soldier from El Salvador tries to get out of the spider web obstacle during the Fuerzas Comando obstacle course July 29 at Fort Tolemaida, Colombia. The course was the final event of the competition. Fuerzas Comando 2014, established in 2004, is a U.S. Southern Command-sponsored special operations skills competition and fellowship program for militaries in the Western Hemisphere.

To se more photos from this commando competition, click here.

To read an article about it in Spanish (En Espanol) click here:

 

August 1, 2014 at 1:44 am Leave a comment

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