Posts filed under ‘Army’

FRIDAY FOTO (September 29, 2017)

Invictus.

Invictus Games 2017

(U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Daniel Luksan)

Medically retired U.S. Marine Corps Lance Corporal Sarah Rudder competes in the 200-meter dash in Toronto, Canada during Invictus Games 2017, an international Paralympic-style event. Rudder, who lost her leg due to injuries suffered at the Pentagon on 9/11, won seven gold medals at last year’s games in Orlando, Florida.

The poem Invictus, by English Victorian poet, William Ernest Henley, himself an amputee, ends with the famous lines:

I am the master of my fate,
      I am the captain of my soul.

For more photos, click here, here, here and here.

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September 29, 2017 at 1:38 am Leave a comment

FRIDAY FOTO (September 1, 2017)

BIG GUN.

3-29th FA Regiment conducts Fire Coordination Exercise

(U.S. Army photo by Gertrud Zach)

Soldiers conduct a fire coordination exercise with an M109A6 Paladin at the Grafenwoehr Training Area in Germany, August 21, 2017. These soldiers are assigned to Battery B, 3rd Battalion, 29th Field Artillery Regiment.

The Paladin is not a tank but a self-propelled howitzer, a field artillery piece that fires its shells at a high trajectory.

This what it looks like when it fires that big gun.

Combined Resolve IX

(U.S. Army photo by Sergeant Matthew Hulett).

 

 

September 1, 2017 at 10:55 am Leave a comment

FRIDAY FOTO (August 18, 2017)

… with wings as eagles.

Bicycle those twists out

(U.S. Army photo by Staff Sergeant Daniel Love)

A bald eagle soars by a paratrooper descending from a UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter over Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska. The soldier is a member of the 25th Infantry Division’s 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne). The photo was taken July 27, 2017.

If you’re curious about the quote in the headline above the photo, it comes from the Book of Isiah, 40:31. The King James Version, which is most often quoted version is below.

“But they that wait upon the LORD shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run, and not be weary; and they shall walk, and not faint.”

(Courtesy of Bible Hub: http://biblehub.com/isaiah/40-31.htm)

One Oscar-nominated film where the Bible verse played a prominent role is  Battleground, a 1949 film that, long before Band of Brothers, told the story of the 101st Airborne Division (the Screaming Eagles), when they were surrounded by the Germans at Bastogne during the Battle of the Bulge five years earlier.

We couldn’t find the film clip on YouTube where a dejected soldier played by Marshall Thompson quotes the verse — first, mockingly when there is no airdrop of badly needed supplies and ammo — and then joyously when the clouds break and relief comes through.

But here’s another famous scene from that film that seems to address some of the issues America faces today.

August 18, 2017 at 4:27 pm Leave a comment

FRIDAY FOTO (August 4, 2017)

Night of the Drone.

Panther Storm

(U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sergeant Andrew Lee)

By now regular visitors to 4GWAR have seen many photos shot through a night vision device, but this one reminds us of a poster for a horror or science fiction movie.

Here we see Army Specialist Derek Opthof preparing to launch an RQ-11 Raven drone (unmanned aerial vehicle or UAV, is the military term). This photo was shot July 27 during exercise Panther Storm at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. The deployment readiness exercise tests the 82nd Airborne Division‘s ability to rapidly deploy its Global Response Force anywhere in the world within a few hours.

About the Raven: Yes, even in this high tech, digital age, some smaller drones have to be launched by hand. Here’s a three-minute video on YouTube that shows how it works in daylight. Click on the RQ-11 Raven link above to learn more at the manufacturer, AeroVironment’s website.

August 4, 2017 at 1:37 am Leave a comment

FRIDAY FOTO (July 28, 2017)

Desert Encounter.

FRIFO 7-28-2017 Stryker Apache

(U.S. Army photo by Private First Class Austin Anyzeski)

A U.S. Army AH-64 Apache helicopter assigned to the 4th Infantry Division’s 1st Stryker Brigade Combat Team, flies over a simulated enemy armored vehicle during an engagement at National Training Center, Fort Irwin, California in the Mojave Desert. The “engagement” is part of an exercise to challenge the Brigade’s ability to defend against a near-peer opposing force. In other words, fighting another nation’s military rather than insurgents or terrorists. The photo was taken July 1, 2017.

To see the kind of training they do at this National Training Center, click here to see a short (3:23 minute) video with no narration. Or click here for a narrated 20:00 minute video.

July 28, 2017 at 1:18 pm Leave a comment

FRIDAY FOTO (July 14, 2017)

Lafayette, We Are Here, Encore.

U.S. Forces Honored During Bastille National Day Parade

(U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Michael McNabb)

U.S. service members march in the Bastille Day parade in Paris as blue, white and red smoke trails billow overhead from a flyover conducted by French Alpha jets. U.S. troops led the parade in a historic first to commemorate the centennial of America’s entry into World War I, as well as its long-standing partnership with France.

ww1soldiersdock Bastille Day 2017

U.S. soldiers on the dock in France. (Courtesy TeeJaw Blog)

In all, 4.7 million Americas served in uniform in the Great War, more than 116,000 died.

U.S. Forces Honored During Bastille National Day Parade

(U.S. Navy photo by Chief Petty Officer Michael McNabb)

Here’s a closer look at the U.S. contingent marching in the 2017 Bastille Day parade. The color guard are dressed in World War I helmets and uniforms. Behind them, in order march the U.S. Army contingent, U.S. Marine Corps, U.S. Navy and U.S. Air Force. Interesting to note the U.S. Army now wears berets instead of the Smoky the Bear campaign hats in the archive photo above.

July 14 marks the storming of the Bastille, a notorious prison in Paris, sparking the French Revolution in 1789. Every year on that date, there is an enormous military parade in Paris with Foreign Legionnaires in their white kepis and red and green epaulettes, sabre-brandishing cavalry of the Republican Guard in plumed helmets, sailors in white caps topped by red pompoms, pilots in flight suits and all manner of military cadets, national police and specialty troops.

July 14, 2017 at 5:08 pm Leave a comment

UNMANNED AIRCRAFT: Cyclocopters Go All-Terrain

Paddlewheel Propulsion.

The U.S. Army’s quest for autonomous reconnaissance aircraft that can fit in the palm of a soldier’s hand has led to a breakthrough in vertical lift technology by researchers utilizing a concept long-known, but never successfully demonstrated: the cyclocopter.

Cyclocopter-Uof Md water test

The multi-modal quadrotor cyclocopter developed at the University of Maryland began aquatic mode testing in March. The unmanned aircraft, equipped with plastic foam pontoons, successfully crossed calm water. (Photo via Elena Shrestha)

A cyclocopter is a vertical lift aircraft — but unlike a helicopter — it has at least two rotors, one on either side of the servo and autopilot. A ring of rotor blades extend horizontally like the wings of an airplane and rotate around a horizontal axis, moving in a cycloidal way, like a paddlewheel on a riverboat.

Your 4GWAR editor reports on the latest developments in these tiny unmanned aircraft in the new issue of Vertiflite, a publication of the American Helicopter Society (AHS) International.

In flight, the cyclocopter’s cycloidal rotors and their circular housing look something like a speeding exercise wheel in a hamster cage, but without the hamster. The angle of the rotor blades can be shifted, altering lift and thrust that allows the aircraft to shift seamlessly from vertical to horizontal. The rotating multiple, uniform blades provide the aircraft with 360 degrees of thrust vectoring.

The cyclo rotor concept is over 100 years old with recorded experiments dating back to 1909 but early researchers focused on manned flight and were never able to demonstrate a vehicle that could fly, despite several attempts in the 1930s

Texas A&M tiny cyclocopter

Researchers at Texas A&M achieved the world’s smallest cyclocopter, weighing just 29 g (1 oz). (Photo via Moble Benedict)

With funding from the Army Research Laboratory, engineers at the University of Maryland and Texas A&M University have been designing, building and flying unmanned  cyclocopters to demonstrate their agility and viability. At Maryland’s Alfred Gessow Rotorcraft Center, student researchers have built small unmanned cyclocopters ranging in weight from just over two ounces (60 grams) to almost two pounds (900 grams). The largest of the little drones is multi-modal and designed to travel across land and water, as well as the air. At Texas A&M’s Advanced Vertical Flight Laboratory, researchers have also developed a range of increasingly smaller cyclo rotor-powered drones, including one that weighs just 29 grams, currently the smallest ever made.

Anticipating challenging battle environments that U.S. forces will face in future conflicts, the Army Research Lab’s Micro Autonomous Systems and Technology (MAST) program began looking for promising technologies that would provide portable air and ground situational awareness devices for soldiers moving on foot through complex terrain, like dense urban areas. MAST’s Collaborative Technology Alliance (MAST-CTA) was created in 2008 to encourage cooperation among the military, industry and 20 research universities ….

TO READ THE REST OF THE STORY IN THE JULY/AUGUST ISSUE OF VERTIFLITE MAGAZINE, CLICK HERE.

VERTIFLITE-JA17-cover1 (2)

 

 

 

July 12, 2017 at 11:42 pm Leave a comment

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