Posts filed under ‘Traditions’

FRIDAY FOTO (March 10, 2017)

Logging Some Miles.

Air Liaison Officers test cadets

(U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Daniel Snider)

Who says modern warfare is just about pushing buttons? Not these Air Force Academy cadets. The cadets were carrying a log during a medical evacuation march at Camp Bullis, Texas, last month (February 16, 2017). The cadets were required to trek multiple miles carrying logs and simulated casualties to a medical evacuation zone in limited time.

Not exactly simple as rolling off a log.

March 10, 2017 at 12:45 am Leave a comment

FRIDAY FOTO (February 24, 2017)

Narrow Margin.

170220-N-WV703-158

(U.S. Navy photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Amy M. Ressler.)

Two Navy air crewmen share close quarters aboard an MH-60S Seahawk helicopter during a live fire exercise over the South China Sea, on February 21, 2017.

These crewman are assigned to the USS Coronado, a fast agile littoral combat ship.

February 24, 2017 at 12:36 am Leave a comment

FRIDAY FOTO (January 13, 2017)

Mirror Image.

Armed Forces Full Honor Review for Carter

(Defense Department photo by E.J. Hersom)

The U.S. Navy Ceremonial Guard  seems to hover above a highly-polished floor (deck) as it stands in formation during Defense Secretary Ashton Carter‘s farewell ceremony at Joint Base Myer-Henderson Hall, Virginia on January 9, 2016. These sailors are assigned to Naval District Washington, D.C., which  includes the U.S. Naval Academy (Annapolis), Bethesda Naval Hospital, Naval Air Station Patuxent River (Pax River) and Camp David, all in Maryland, as well as Naval Support Facility Dahlgren in Virginia and Joint Base Anacostia-Bolling in Washington, DC.

Carter, became the 25th Secretary of Defense in February 2015. He previously served as deputy defense secretary from 2011 to 2013, and as undersecretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics (2009-2011). Carter also worked at the Pentagon during the Clinton administration (1993-1996), as assistant secretary of Defense for International Security Policy. He received the Defense Department’s Distinguished Service Medal — its highest civilian award — five times.

Retired Marine Corps General James Mattis will succeed Carter, if confirmed by the Senate, when the Trump administration comes into office.

 

January 13, 2017 at 12:15 am Leave a comment

FRIDAY FOTO (January 6, 2017)

Herculean View.

Operation Christmas Drop 16

(U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Elizabeth Baker)
This aircrew aboard a C-130 Hercules circling over a remote island in Micronesia last month appear to have the have the best seat in the house. Assigned to the 36th Airlift Squadron,  the crew was practicing airdrop procedures December 5, 2016 during Operation Christmas Drop. Each year Operation Christmas Drop provides tools, food, clothing and toys to over 30,000 islanders in the Pacific.

In addition to highlighting the complicated cockpit technology — with the heavenly view — we thought this photo and the operation it illustrates  was a suitable holiday season subject for today, January 6 — Three Kings Day. Also known as the feast of the Magi or Epiphany, the holiday is also celebrated in many countries as the last day of the Christmas season (the 12th Day of Christmas, as in the song).

January 6, 2017 at 12:14 am Leave a comment

FRIDAY FOTO (September 9, 2016)

Airborne Weaponry.

frifo-9-9-2016

U.S. Air Force photo by Technical Sergeant Joshua L. DeMotts

The U.S. Air Force concerns itself with things that fly — fixed wing aircraft, helicopters,  missiles — and M-1 rifles with fixed bayonets, too, apparently.

Here we see the Air Force Honor Guard Drill Team performing at the Air Force Memorial in Arlington, Virginia, to honor Vietnam War veterans.

September 9, 2016 at 1:07 am Leave a comment

SHAKO: A D-Day Memory Repeated

Twice Told Tale: June 5, 1944.

In honor of the 72nd anniversary of the Invasion of Normandy during World War II, we thought we’d re-run this post from the 40th anniversary in 2014. – John M. Doyle

A D-Day Story – With a Twist.

ike and 101st

Gen. Eisenhower talks with 101st Airborne Division paratroopers before D-Day. (Defense Dept. photo)

All the attention and remembrances that the 70th anniversary of the D-Day landings in France is getting recently jogged my memory about another D-Day story I uncovered 30 years ago – for the 40th anniversary of history’s biggest amphibious invasion.

Your 4GWAR editor was South Bend, Indiana correspondent for the Associated Press when someone told me about a priest then serving at the University of Notre Dame who had a great D-Day story. Monsignor Francis L. Sampson had been an Army chaplain serving with the 501st Parachute Regiment of the 101st Airborne Division. (The same division but a different regiment from the one featured in the book and cable TV series “Band of Brothers.”)

Sampson parachuted into Normandy along with the 101st the night before D-Day, was captured by the Waffen SS and almost shot on June 6. After the Germans realized he was only a chaplain they let him return to the barn where he had been tending wounded paratroopers too badly hurt to be moved. He and an Army medic tended both German and U.S. wounded until American forces overran the area and captured the Germans who had captured Sampson.

He went on to jump into Holland in late 1944 in Operation Market Garden (“A Bridge too Far”), was captured again at the Battle of the Bulge in December 1944 and liberated from a grim German POW camp by Russian troops in April 1945.

Pretty good story, I thought, as I pitched it to my editor in Indianapolis. But he told me about a Frenchman, now a local business magazine publisher who was a small boy in Normandy on that night in June, 1944. Bernard Marie, who was then in his mid 40s, was offering a free lunch in Indianapolis to any U.S. vet who could prove he was in Normandy on what became known as “The Longest Day.”

We decided to combine both men’s stories after I interviewed them and also put them in touch with each other. Here is the beginning of the story that ran in U.S. newspapers on the afternoon of June 5, 1984:

SOUTH BEND, Ind. (AP) – On the night of June 5, 1944, Bernard Marie spent his fifth birthday huddled in a cellar 25 miles from Omaha Beach. Monsignor Francis L. Sampson flew through German anti-aircraft fire over Normandy, convinced he was going to die.

The story had some humorous and harrowing anecdotes. My favorite was when the first U.S. paratroopers broke into little Bernard’s house. He thought their four-letter-word cussing sounded like German (think about it). And was terrified the Germans had come to get his family. But when he saw the American flag patch sewn on every trooper’s sleeve he knew things were going to be all right, he told me.

Back to 1984: Press photographers captured the embrace of the 72-year-old Catholic priest and the grown up French boy – even though they had never met before – amid scores of applauding WWII vets.

But the story doesn’t end there. While trying to find a complete copy of the original story, which so far hasn’t happened. I came across Monsignor Sampson’s obituary in the Des Moines Register (he was a native of Iowa). I learned that he had stayed in the Army rising to the rank of major general (two stars) and had served as the Army’s Chief of Chaplains from 1967 to 1971. He died in January 1996.

Fr_ Francis L Sampson grave marker 1912 to 1996

But what really got my attention was a sidebar in the obituary, that noted an action Sampson performed in the days immediately after D-Day, may have inspired – at least in part – the movie “Saving Private Ryan.” See for yourself, here.

For more on this remarkable career that spanned three wars and a lot of souls in need, click here.

To learn more about D-Day, click here for the Defense Department’s 72nd Anniversary page.

SHAKO

SHAKO is an occasional 4GWAR posting on military history, traditions and culture. For the uninitiated, a shako is the tall, billed headgear worn by many armies from the Napoleonic era to about the time of the American Civil War. It remains a part of the dress or parade uniform of several military organizations like the corps of cadets at the U.S. Military Academy, West Point, New York.

 

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Entry filed under: National Security and Defense, SHAKO, Skills and Training, Traditions. Tags: , , , , , .

THIS WEEK in the War of 1812 (June 1-June 7, 1814) FRIDAY FOTO ADVISORY

 

June 6, 2016 at 3:33 pm Leave a comment

SHAKO: Memorial Day 2016

Assessing the Toll.

Memorial Day, a holiday that grew out of efforts to honor the dead of the Civil War — North and South — commemorates the fallen. Veteran’s Day, as the Washington Post points out, was created after World War I to honor all who served their country in war and peace.

They say Freedom has a price. The chart below shows how Americans have been paying that price for more than 200 years.

Military deaths chart

The photos below show that debt has been paid — with interest — by the living as well.

Memorial Day in Arlington National Cemetery 2015

Army photo by Rachel Larue

Brittany, left, and her four-year-old son, Christian, spend time at the grave of husband and father, Marine Corps Sergeant Christopher Jacobs, in Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia. Christian wore his father’s cover (uniform hat) during the Memorial Day visit.

Memorial Day FistBump

Dept. of Defense  photo by Roger Wollenberg

Marine Corps veterans Eric Rodriguez, left, and Anthony McDaniel fist bump during the gold medal wheelchair basketball competition at the 2016 Invictus Games for wounded warriors in Orlando, Florida on May 12.

May 30, 2016 at 9:56 pm Leave a comment

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